Seven day case average drops again, death rate slightly increases Saturday

Seven day case average drops again, death rate slightly increases Saturday


MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) — The Wisconsin Department of Health Services reported 1,681 positive cases in a batch of 7,460 results for people getting tested — or testing positive — for the coronavirus for the first time. The remaining 5,779 tested negative.

The 7-day average dropped for the twelfth straight day, and is down to 1,666 cases per day, the lowest since Sept. 19. According to our calculations, Saturday’s positivity rate of 22.53% is in line with the 7-day average of 24.34%. Our records show the last time the seven day positivity rate went below 25% was on December 26th.

The state added 42 COVID-19 deaths Saturday. That figure dropped the 7-day average from 46 patients dying per day to 34, however the death rate rose slightly from 1.06% to 1.07%. The increase comes after health officials reported a 1.06% rate for three straight days.

Wisconsin has now tested more than 3 million people (3,000,975) — more than half of the state’s population — in just under 12 months.

In addition, the state reports more than a half-million people (502,593) who were infected by the coronavirus are now considered recovered, which is 94.5% of all known cases. To be recovered, 30 days must pass since the onset of symptoms or a positive test, or a person must be medically cleared. The DHS acknowledges some of them may be feeling lingering effects from their infection, such as brain fog, headaches and muscle aches or lethargy. State health officials report there are 23,414 cases currently active, or 4.4% of all cases.

County case and death numbers appear later in this article.

The DHS also tracks results for people tested multiple times, such as health care workers or patients being treated for COVID-19. The 7-day average for the positivity rate by that measure dropped steeply from 6.6% to 6.5% on Friday. (The DHS calculation is a day behind because it’s based on preliminary numbers, including negative tests undergoing further review.) Reporting one test per person, no matter how many times they’re tested, is considered a better indicator of the virus’s spread in the community; it’s how the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention compiles its own reports.

VACCINATIONS

The state continues to report progress in COVID-19 vaccinations. The latest numbers from Friday show 310,256 “shots in the arm.” The state reports 56,680 people have received their second, final dose, which is 4,879 more than Thursday’s report. These numbers are preliminary for a few days as vaccinators’ reports continue coming in. Vaccination administration numbers are updated Monday through Friday.

The DHS now includes vaccination information by age and gender on its website (CLICK HERE). The vaccine data page also lets you narrow down vaccinations per day by county or Healthcare Emergency Readiness Coalition (HERC) — use the pulldown menu at the upper right corner of the graph at https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/vaccine-data.htm#day.

Hospitalizations

The state says 89 more people were hospitalized for COVID-19 in the last 24-hour period. Hospitalizations have been in double digits again for three days in a row, and five of the past 7 days. The state is averaging 86 hospitalizations per day over the last week, the lowest average since Oct. 6. A total 23,625 COVID-19 patients have been hospitalized, which is 4.4% of all known cases.

On Saturday, the WHA reports there are 771 COVID-19 patients in the state’s hospitals, according to the Wisconsin Hospital Association (WHA). That’s 14 fewer than Friday. The WHA says 172 of these patients are in intensive care, which is 6 fewer than Friday. This marks 10 days with fewer than 1,000 COVID-19 patients in hospitals at one time, and four straight days with fewer than 200 in ICU.

There are 67 COVID-19 patients in the Fox Valley region’s 13 hospitals, with 7 in ICU. That’s 3 more in ICU and 5 more overall than Friday.

There are 84 COVID-19 patients in the Northeast region’s hospitals, including 12 in ICU. That’s 7 fewer patients in ICU and five fewer patients overall then the day before.

Hospital Readiness

The WHA further reported the state’s 134 hospitals have 278 ICU beds (18.9%) and 2,049 of all types of medical beds (18.3%) open — that’s ICU, intermediate care, medical surgical and negative flow isolation.

The Fox Valley’s 13 hospitals had 8 ICU beds (7.6%) among them and 96 medical beds total (11.2%) open for the eight counties they serve.

The Northeast region’s 10 hospitals had 51 ICU beds (24.6%) and 239 of all medical beds (25%) for patients in seven counties.

These beds are for all patients, not just COVID-19. We use the term “open” instead of “available” because whether a bed can be filled depends on whether the hospital has enough staffing for a patient in that bed, including doctors, nurses and food services.

SATURDAY’S COUNTY CASES AND DEATHS (Counties with new cases or deaths are indicated in bold) *

Wisconsin

  • Adams – 1,465 cases (+8) (11 deaths)
  • Ashland – 1,117 cases (+4) (16 deaths)
  • Barron – 5,006 cases (+22) (68 deaths) (+2)
  • Bayfield – 1,018 cases (+1) (18 deaths)
  • Brown – 28,770 cases (+77) (190 deaths) (+4)
  • Buffalo – 1,230 cases (+6) (7 deaths)
  • Burnett – 1,075 cases (+4) (23 deaths)
  • Calumet – 5,109 cases (+17) (39 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 6,657 cases (+15) (76 deaths)
  • Clark – 3,051 cases (+8) (57 deaths) (+1)
  • Columbia – 4,723 cases (+16) (39 deaths)
  • Crawford – 1,627 cases (+1) (15 deaths) (+1)
  • Dane – 37,078 cases (+134) (229 deaths) (+1)
  • Dodge – 11,031 cases (+24) (138 deaths) (+5)
  • Door – 2,323 cases (+9) (18 deaths)
  • Douglas – 3,477 cases (+8) (18 deaths)
  • Dunn – 3,945 cases (+7) (26 deaths) (+1)
  • Eau Claire – 10,311 cases (+40) (97 deaths)
  • Florence – 417 cases (12 deaths)
  • Fond du Lac – 11,367 cases (+31) (76 deaths)
  • Forest – 899 cases (+2) (22 deaths)
  • Grant – 4,407 cases (+5) (78 deaths)
  • Green – 2,613 cases (+16) (12 deaths) (+1)
  • Green Lake – 1,472 cases (+5) (14 deaths)
  • Iowa – 1,775 cases (+5) (9 deaths)
  • Iron – 469 cases (+2) (19 deaths)
  • Jackson – 2,524 cases (+3) (20 deaths)
  • Jefferson – 7,393 cases (+33) (66 deaths) (+2)
  • Juneau – 2,836 cases (+11) (15 deaths)
  • Kenosha – 13,971 cases (+49) (262 deaths) (+4)
  • Kewaunee – 2,303 cases (+12) (26 deaths)
  • La Crosse – 11,279 cases (+62) (70 deaths) (+1)
  • Lafayette – 1,347 cases (+4) (7 deaths)
  • Langlade – 1,876 cases (+1) (31 deaths) (+1)
  • Lincoln – 2,756 cases (+13) (53 deaths)
  • Manitowoc – 6,807 cases (+19) (60 deaths) (+1)
  • Marathon – 13,081 cases (+45) (169 deaths) (+1)
  • Marinette – 3,855 cases (+12) (58 deaths)
  • Marquette – 1,240 cases (+3) (21 deaths) (+1)
  • Menominee – 781 cases (11 deaths)
  • Milwaukee – 93,188 (+270) (1,113 deaths) (+1)
  • Monroe – 3,972 cases (+22) (30 deaths)
  • Oconto – 4,097 cases (+10) (44 deaths)
  • Oneida – 3,082 cases (+18) (55 deaths) (+2)
  • Outagamie – 18,012 cases (+62) (172 deaths) (+1)
  • Ozaukee – 7,199 cases (+32) (68 deaths) (+2)
  • Pepin – 770 cases (+3) (7 deaths)
  • Pierce – 3,242 cases (+8) (32 deaths)
  • Polk – 3,474 cases (+14) (39 deaths) (+1)
  • Portage – 6,022 cases (+8) (58 deaths) (+1)
  • Price – 1,071 cases (+17) (7 deaths)
  • Racine – 19,523 cases (+51) (290 deaths)
  • Richland – 1,202 cases (+6) (13 deaths)
  • Rock – 13,506 cases (+73) (134 deaths) (+1)
  • Rusk – 1,214 cases (+2) (14 deaths)
  • Sauk – 4,958 cases (+12) (35 deaths)
  • Sawyer – 1,382 cases (+15) (17 deaths)
  • Shawano – 4,453 cases (+11) (66 deaths)
  • Sheboygan – 12,314 cases (+28) (111 deaths)
  • St. Croix – 5,979 cases (+26) (38 deaths) (+2)
  • Taylor – 1,729 cases (+6) (20 deaths) (+1)
  • Trempealeau – 3,247 cases (+9) (34 deaths)
  • Vernon – 1,698 cases (+8) (33 deaths)
  • Vilas – 1,851 cases (+10) (31 deaths)
  • Walworth – 8,449 cases (+13) (116 deaths)
  • Washburn – 1,198 cases (+12) (15 deaths)
  • Washington – 13,042 cases (+46) (119 deaths)
  • Waukesha – 38,394 cases (+76) (420 deaths) (+5)
  • Waupaca – 4,528 cases (+15) (104 deaths) (+1)
  • Waushara – 2,027 cases (+7) (24 deaths)
  • Winnebago – 16,315 cases (+37) (166 deaths)
  • Wood – 6,233 cases (+20) (64 deaths) (+1)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula **

  • Alger – 253 cases (1 death)
  • Baraga – 485 cases (30 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 681 cases (19 deaths)
  • Delta – 2,593 cases (62 deaths)
  • Dickinson – 2,079 cases (56 deaths)
  • Gogebic – 803 cases (15 deaths)
  • Houghton – 1,925 cases (29 deaths)
  • Iron – 840 cases (35 deaths)
  • Keweenaw – 100 cases (1 death)
  • Luce – 129 cases
  • Mackinac – 272 cases (3 deaths)
  • Marquette – 3,368 cases (State revised, decrease of 1) (53 deaths)
  • Menominee – 1,569 cases (34 deaths)
  • Ontonagon – 307 cases (16 deaths)
  • Schoolcraft – 225 cases (4 deaths)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula **

* Cases and deaths are from the daily DHS COVID-19 reports, which may differ from local health department numbers. The DHS reports cases from all health departments within a county’s boundaries, including tribal, municipal and county health departments; county websites may not. Also, public health departments update their data at various times, whereas the DHS freezes the numbers it receives by the same time every day to compile the afternoon report.

The DHS reports deaths attributed to COVID-19 or in which COVID-19 contributed to their death. Most of the people severely affected by the coronavirus have underlying illnesses or conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease or obesity, which raises a person’s risk of dying from COVID-19. They would’ve lived longer if not for their infection. The state may revise case and death numbers after further review, such as the victim’s residence, duplicated records, or a correction in lab results. Details can be found on the DHS website and Frequently Asked Questions.

**The state of Michigan does not update numbers on Sundays. Monday’s numbers include updates since Saturday’s reporting deadline.

COVID-19 Tracing App

Wisconsin’s COVID-19 tracing app, “Wisconsin Exposure Notification,” is available for iOS and Android smartphones. No download is required for iPhones. The Android app is available on Google Play. When two phones with the app (and presumably their owners) are close enough, for long enough, they’ll anonymously share a random string of numbers via Bluetooth. If someone tests positive for the coronavirus, they’ll receive a code to type into the app. If your phones “pinged” each other in the last 14 days, you’ll receive a push notification that you are at risk of exposure. The app doesn’t collect personal information or location information, so you won’t know from whom or where, but you will be told what day the exposure might have occurred so that you can quarantine for the appropriate amount of time.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it.
  • Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments

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